1. moiix asked: i havent been diagnosed with cfs but after getting a viral infection and being sick for the past 2 months with exhaustion, pain and much much more i know its post viral fatigue/ chronic fatigue. what do you do to cope? i honestly feel like im never going to get better and this is kind of the last straw for me. ive never been this depressed and my lifes supposed to be starting but i had to quit my first year of uni. the only thing keeping me going is my boyfriend. does it ever get better?

    whatshouldwecallchronicillness:

    Well I’m just one person with an opinion based on my own experiences, but yes, it gets SO MUCH BETTER.  In my opinion, the first year or two is the worst.  (Well the first year I was in denial, so really the second year for me.  haha)  Once you get a good team of doctors and learn all about your chronic illness, there may be a lot you can do to help with symptoms.  And even if not, in my case I adjusted to my “new normal” and don’t really feel like I’m missing out on much anymore.  I have more realistic expectations for myself and life so I don’t get disappointed as often.   Well I say more realistic, but I’m still pretty committed to grad school and traveling and stuff.  I just am ok with doing it with lots of accommodations and taking it slow and stuff.  And I went from resenting all my forced down time to filling it with meaningful activities that I can do even when tired and in lots of pain.  It’s amazing how much one can accomplish while laying in bed!  haha  Anyway…despite my many limitations and feeling like crap a lot of the time, I’m still pretty happy overall.  It took a while to get there though.  Figuring it all out doesn’t happen overnight.  

    Oh, and I got sick in my second year in college, so I totally get that whole level of frustration.  College was supposed to be the best time of my life and I found myself either not able to attend or struggling through.  Now that I’m in grad school I feel like I’m getting a second chance and that helps as far as accepting everything.   One important thing I learned from being sick is that life doesn’t have to follow this linear path that is the same as everyone else’s.  It’s ok to take time off of school and then take six years to graduate.  It’s ok to not have the same life experience as your peers.  You’ll figure out what’s right for you.  In time you may find that being forced to take an alternate path is kind of freeing.  It’s all about you and what you want.  

    Good luck!  And sorry this became so long.  I tend to be rather verbose.  :0P  Feel free to PM me if you ever want to chat.  

    Oh man, did I ever need to hear this <3

     

  2. Omg Boyfriend #2 lent me his doggy for the day

    My aunt is cleaning my apartment

    My uncle is buying me food at Trader Joe’s

    I just don’t even know how to even.

     

  3.  
  4. annavonsyfert:

    drama and snake-friendship.

    I was gonna make like a 2 page comic just for fun and then it ended up with 6 pages, woops

    What on earth did I just read, and can I please have more.

    (via kateordie)

     
  5. Tagged #i jus #frog
     
  6. contempt-loves-the-silence:

    Promise?

    Hey kids (especially OP), this piece of art is from Boggle the Owl’s blog, which can be found right here. Original post is here. The person who runs this blog is incredibly kind and talented, and deserves to be recognized for their work.

    Please be sure to source your art properly. Although it’s sometimes difficult to track down the source of something that’s gone through the Pinterest/9gag/Tumblr/Facebook filter a few times, you can use Google Images’ search by image function to do some sleuthing. 

    (via allofthething-things)

     

  7. realsocialskills:

    tikken:

    realsocialskills:

    Content warning: this post probably uses language that gets used against abuse victims. I’m trying to avoid that, but I don’t think I’ve entirely succeeded, and some of these words might be triggering. Proceed with caution.

    So, here’s the thing.

    People are complicated, and relationships are even more complicated. Abuse victims are often pressured to pretend that things are simple. They’re pressured to believe that if there was any positive aspect whatsoever to an abusive relationship, then it wasn’t really as abusive as they think it was.

    But it doesn’t work that way. People aren’t averaged. People can do some really good things, and some abusive things. They don’t cancel each other out. They coexist. Whatever else happened, the abuse was real, and you’re right not to tolerate it.

    Sometimes… sometimes your abuser is also the person who taught you your favorite recipe.

    Or something fundamental about how you understand the world.

    Or a major skill you now use professionally.

    Or maybe they gave you a lot of valuable criticism that made your art better.

    Or maybe they supported you materially when you were in real trouble.

    Or any number of other things.

    And…

    …none of that makes the abuse ok. None of that is mitigating in any way. It doesn’t cancel anything out. Sometimes people talk like the abusive interactions and the good ones get put in a blender or something, and like some sort of theoretical blended average is what really counts. That’s not how it works. It’s the actual interactions that count, not some theoretical average. The abuse is real, and significant, no matter what else happened.

    It doesn’t have to be one or the other. If some things about an abusive relationship were positive, it’s ok to acknowledge and value them.

    And you can still refuse to ever have anything to do with your abuser ever again. You can still be angry. You can still hate them. You can still decide never to forgive them. You can still warn people against them. None of these things are mutually exclusive.

    And, most importantly, valuing some aspects of the relationship or having some positive memories does not in *any way* mean the abuse was your fault.

    tikken said:

    This is so, so important and I can’t believe it has less than 1,000 notes. This needs to be shared.

    Bolded emphasis mine.

    realsocialskills said:

    Thank you.

    I wrote this months ago, and I’ve gained around 3,000 followers since then. It occurs to me that some of y’all might not have seen this post and might want to see it.

    (via monteraecruso)

     

  8. thefaultinourspoons:

    hyenaboy:

    Hi friends

    My sister was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease last year and she put a call out for someone to talk to who also has it or otherwise looking for resources specifically on how to relieve symptoms. Any resources I can send her way?

    Thaaaank you. :D

    can anyone help?

    Girlfriend?

    (via chronic-frustration-syndrome)

     

  9. swimminghuman asked: Just mad a really similar situation- my doctor apparently needs 4-6 weeks to even read my chart. I wonder what the doctors do all the time. This guy is a specialist for a very rare disease, and I can imagine he has an appointment every day until July. Or even every other day.

    Such a pain, amirite?? Although when you think about it…

    The doctor I’ll be seeing is the ONLY specialist in chronic fatigue in the Northwest. So he probably has a bazillion patients, all of whom want follow-up appointments, regular appointments, etc., and he’s the ONLY ONE that can take them. So he’s probably just doing the best he can with the time/resources he has.

    Not that that makes it suck ANY less, but it does help me get my hackles down when I get frustrated. Better to save the best of my anger for the real douchebag doctors.

     
  10. reals:

    Osaka, Japan | Photographer

    I got really fucking lost in the park surrounding this castle. While boozed up. Alone. In the dead of night. I turned one corner and saw a huge group of stray cats. They all stared up at me at once, their eyes flashing. It was freaky.

    (via simonscloset)